Zewail City Researchers Prove Clinical Efficiency of Stem Cells Therapy for Diabetes Reviewed by Momizat on .   Despite progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms for diabetes, researchers are still searching for effective diabetes therapies. In a   Despite progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms for diabetes, researchers are still searching for effective diabetes therapies. In a Rating: 0
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Zewail City Researchers Prove Clinical Efficiency of Stem Cells Therapy for Diabetes

 

Despite progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms for diabetes, researchers are still searching for effective diabetes therapies.
In a new study, published in Plos One, Zewail City stem cell researchers reveal how stem cell transplantation can represent a safe and effective treatment for selected patients with diabetes.

The authors identified 22 clinical trials with a total of 524 patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. After testing different types of stem cells, the team found out that diabetic patients who received hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) treatment achieved the best outcome (58.9% of them became insulin independent for a mean period of 16 months).

In addition, the team realized that stem cells therapy is more effective at the early stages of diabetes. They have also concluded that patients with previously diagnosed diabetic ketoacidosis are not good candidates for this stem cell therapy approach.

“Although there are thousands of published studies on the application of stem cell therapy in diabetes treatment, this is the first study that critically analyzes all available clinical data, and provides recommendations about this advanced form of therapy,” said Prof. Nagwa El-Badri, director of theCenter of Excellence for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine.

“The study shows the gap between the bench and the bedside in stem cell treatment, but it also shows that the few available clinical trials for diabetes therapy are promising,” added El-Badri.

The study was recommended by Dr. Bjarte G Solheim in F1000 Faculty Reviews, a comprehensive, open access, topical reviews written by members of the prestigious F1000 Faculty context on emerging themes in biology and medicine.

According to Dr. Solheim the study is of interest because it indicates clinical efficacy of non­insulin secreting cells.

The research team consisted of Prof. Nagwa El-Badri and Ahmad El-Badawy, research assistant at the Center of Excellence in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine.

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